Tuesday Tunes: Jerusalem

The Cotswolds   Unofficially, the beautiful hymn,  “Jerusalem” is often seen as a national hymn by many English people.  “Jerusalem” was originally written as a poem by William Blake in 1804.  The lyrics, written by Hubert Parry, were added to music in 1916 during the gloom of WWI when an uplifting new English hymn was well received and needed.   “Bring me my bow of burning gold! Bring me my arrows of desire! Bring me my spear! O clouds, unfold! Bring me my chariot of fire! I will not cease from mental fight, Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, Till we have built Jerusalem In England’s green and pleasant land.”     After visiting a number of wonderful art galleries in the Cotswolds as well as spending the last week in England’s “green and pleasant land,” I was inspired by this country’s many breathtaking landscapes to pass an afternoon painting.  Here’s the result. 🙂 “Sea Dreams” 8.5 x 11.5″ acrylic on canvas. by Tonya Rieley Hengerer   Enjoy your day!

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Tuesday Tunes: Peaceful Skies

Green Hill Farm February 2018   I often listen to Pandora’s symphonic music station while I’m in my makeshift art studio.  It’s relaxing and helps my right brain to engage while I’m working on a painting.  Last Sunday, I heard the beautiful “Flower Duet” from Lakmé—a three-act opera composed by Léo Delibes between 1881 and 1882 and based on a […]

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Friday Farm Favorites: BRRRRR

Farmguy spontaneously took this photograph a few winters ago during a polar vortex.  We were headed out the door to feed our sheep and chickens, and he was amused by my “winter outfit.”  During this time of year, Green Hill Farm is our version of a tundra—we’re in a valley of sorts, surrounded by mountains…and the wind blows with a vengeance.  So, with temperatures dipping into the teens and single digits over night, I’m back to this lovely look, again. Ughh! But, wintertime isn’t all bad.  Even though it’s cold and not fun to go outside, I thought I would embrace the beauty of the season by sharing some of my favorite photographs from past winters on Green Hill Farm. Have a wonderful weekend and stay warm!  

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Aperture

  A friend recently asked me to post a black and white photo for seven days on social media.  A few of the photos here were contenders, but didn’t make the final cut.  Anyway, since I took the time to participate, I thought I would share my collection plus a few extras here as well.  

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Tuesday Tunes: Moondance

Bermuda August 2017   “Well, it’s a marvelous night for a moondance With the stars up above in your eyes A fantabulous night to make romance ‘Neath the cover of October skies And all the leaves on the trees are falling To the sound of the breezes that blow And I’m trying to please to the calling Of your heart-strings […]

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Be Inspired

“You are the books you read, the films you watch, the music you listen to, the people you meet, the dreams you have, the conversations you engage in.  You are what you take from these.  You are the sound of the ocean, the breath of fresh air, the brightest light and the darkest corner.  You are a collective of every experience you have had in your life.  So drown yourself in a sea of knowledge and existence.  Let the words run through your veins and let the colours fill your mind.” ~Jac Vanek          

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Tuesday Tunes: The Whistling Tree Frogs of Bermuda

The song of the Whistling Tree Frog is one of the infamous sounds of a Bermuda night.  These tiny creatures create a beautiful evening sound as they accompany the gentle breezes with their sweet symphony—all from the sound of a cent!  “Gleep, gleep.” Only about the size of a thumbnail, the tree frogs are slight in stature but big in presence. If you’re lucky enough to see one, you’ll be surprised to discover that such a big noise can come from such a small amphibian. There are two species of Whistling Frogs (Tree Frogs) in Bermuda. The Eleutherodactylus johnstonei and Eleutherodactylus gossei, the first of the two is more common and smaller while the other has almost disappeared. Both are brownish, nocturnal, living in trees near the ground and by day hiding under stones and leaves. They are one of the most characteristic night sounds of Bermuda between April and November. They can be heard island-wide when the weather is warm enough (above 69 degrees) but are most common in the Parishes of Devonshire, Paget, Pembroke and Warwick. They are not indigenous – both were introduced accidentally sometime prior to 1880, most likely on orchids imported from the Lesser Antilles. They can be found elsewhere in temperate and sub-tropical regions, but mainly can be found singing loudly at night. Here’s a snippet of the enchanting Tree Frogs’ melody.  Enjoy!

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