Heirloom Recipe: Tomato Soup

When we hear someone speak of a family heirloom, we may envision a pocket watch, silver teapot or even a quilt.  Recipes are also treasured pieces of family history passed down from generation to generation.  This tomato soup recipe originally belonged to my great-grandmother, Delia Crumpaker Rieley and dates back to the 1800s.  I remember watching Grandma Rieley making it during the winter months with juice from tomatoes canned the previous summer.  Last week, with temperatures dropping, I decided to make my family’s heirloom recipe for tomato soup; I made it in my great-grandmother’s kitchen with homemade juice from tomatoes grown on our 106-year-old family farm.  I loved being part of that continuity.  In taking time to carry on simple traditions, not only do we connect with the past, but we perpetuate memories that we hold dear. My great-grandmother most likely made this tomato soup with fresh milk from Green Hill Dairy Farm and the summer’s bounty of tomatoes picked from my great-grandfather’s vegetable garden. It is very simple, only requiring 3 ingredients; however, don’t let its simplicity fool you.  It’s delicious!  Just the thing on a cold evening–it really hits the spot!  Serve casually in a mug or in a bowl garnished with a little basil for color (my addition).  Oh, and don’t forget oyster crackers–the perfect accompaniment.  Enjoy! Heirloom Recipe:  Tomato Soup *Use organic ingredients when possible Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 quart tomato juice (homemade is best) 1 […]

Read More →

Friday Farm Favorites: BRRRRR

Farmguy spontaneously took this photograph a few winters ago during a polar vortex.  We were headed out the door to feed our sheep and chickens, and he was amused by my “winter outfit.”  During this time of year, Green Hill Farm is our version of a tundra—we’re in a valley of sorts, surrounded by mountains…and the wind blows with a vengeance.  So, with temperatures dipping into the teens and single digits over night, I’m back to this lovely look, again. Ughh! But, wintertime isn’t all bad.  Even though it’s cold and not fun to go outside, I thought I would embrace the beauty of the season by sharing some of my favorite photographs from past winters on Green Hill Farm. Have a wonderful weekend and stay warm!  

Read More →

Snowed In On Green Hill Farm

Originally posted on fourth generation farmgirl:
Acrostic poetry by Tonya R. Hengerer “Snow” Softly falling– Not a sound, Only Whirling, whirling to the ground. ? “Winter” When Icy, cold weather Naturally interrupts The warmth Enjoyed upon Earth Radiated by the sun. ? “Shovel” Something with which one Heaves snow Out of the way; a Very useful, Everyday tool–mostly Languishing in…

Read More →

Friday Farm Favorites

*I had a few issues with re-sharing this post yesterday, so I thought I’d give it another go.  My apologies if you saw it already.   BRRR!!  It’s cold and windy outside, and it’s supposed to get even colder this weekend…8 degrees on Saturday.  There is also snow in the forecast.  I decided to re-share this post as I recently came inside from walking the dogs as well as feeding the barn cats, sheep, and chickens–plus, gathering eggs.  And, I. am. frozen.  Let me just say…I can’t feel my fingers yet. On a sunnier note, all the critters on Green Hill Farm are healthy and happy, and that’s definitely a heartwarming thought.  I hope you enjoy the wintry photos. Have a wonderful weekend! 🙂 Farmguy spontaneously took this photograph last winter as we headed out the door to feed our sheep and chickens. He was amused by my “winter outfit” and wanted to capture the moment. I don’t normally dress like this, but it was during one of the polar vortexes.  You see, in the winter, Green Hill Farm is our version of a tundra.  So, with temperatures dipping into single digits over the last few days, I’m back to this lovely look, again. Ughh! Even though it’s cold and not fun to go outside, I thought I would embrace the beauty of the season by sharing some photographs from past winters on Green Hill Farm.  I hope you enjoy!

Read More →

The Weekly Bleat

With cooler mornings, we often find our sheep waiting for us by the paddock gate.  Apparently, they possess some kind of built-in sensor that indicates if the thermometer dips below 40 degrees F., because they seem to have an uncanny way of knowing it’s grain treat weather.  We can usually look out of the kitchen window as day breaks and […]

Read More →